Saturday, July 4th, 2020

If Brett Could Change His Career At 60, So Can You

 

“I feel like I can say to people in a huge range of situations – ‘Yes, I see you.'”

~ Brett Muir, Point of Change

 

Brett Muir’s personal story of reinvention is an inspiring call to action for us all. At a time in life when many midlifers believe they are too old to change, Brett is challenging convention. “I want to make this my best decade yet,” he told me when I asked, “Why now? Why change careers and train to become a Worklife Solutions Certified Career and Life Coach?”

As you’ll read, Brett first embarked on training with another provider, only to find it didn’t meet his growing needs. But that’s not the real story. The real story is his vision for his coaching business, Point of Change and his deep desire to help others make a change for the better. And within weeks of starting his training, he’s up and running with another aspect of his vision, a forum to bring like-minded people together. If you’re in Christchurch, New Zealand—or can make it there—be sure to check it out.

I will let Brett tell his career reinvention story, but one of the things I most love  (as you’ll read below) was the way he did his due diligence before making a leap—but more importantly, when life threw a few financial hurdles in his path he used out of the box thinking and found another way.

Every great story is drawn from intentions and obstacles. To be the hero’s and heroines of our own stories is what makes life rewarding.

Many of the questions I asked Brett are drawn from screenwriting legend Christopher Vogler and his guide to story structure (inspired by the work of Joseph Campbell’s The Hero’s (and heroine’s) Journey. I’ve put some of the stages in brackets.

 

 

Why did you decide to train to be a life coach?

It became apparent that this occupation was ideally suited to my personality, my direction, my psyche. I find no greater joy than helping people take another step forward, over, through or around obstacles. There is nothing like it. I have enjoyed the various stages of my career, but I am at my most energised when I am helping someone taking a giant step of personal growth.

Wherever I am, I am aware of the people around me. I am inevitably involved, you may say immersed, in deep, in profound conversations with people in my everyday world. I often feel like I want to adopt people – mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers, sons, daughters. I connect in a way that leaves me amazed. Yes, I am one of those who chats to passing strangers, to the annoyance of my family at times.

I feel like I can say to people in a huge range of situations – “yes, I see you.”

 

What factors influenced your decision to train with Worklife Solutions/Cassandra?

I talked to someone else, who at a similar age and stage to myself, had worked with Cassandra and for whom it had been a new beginning. I liked the framework which was available to lean on, as I began a new journey. I liked the diversity of projects Cassandra is involved in. I like having a clear base of workbooks, of tools. There was a sense that Cassandra was constantly challenging herself but giving herself permission to grow and change. I saw Cassandra as a great resource person. Early days yet but I am enjoying the start of my most transformative decade yet. That’s the goal, that’s the plan.

 

You initially trained with someone else? Why did you delay training with Worklife Solutions?

I see that a diverse training is helpful so I plan to be part of two Life Coaching organisations, being part of a range of ongoing training opportunities. My initial week-long course was fantastic, a great place to begin the Life Coaching journey. I saw that for me, a coaching call every 2 weeks after that would enable me to assimilate all the new informations, the new learnings. I do like a week-long course and the enjoyment of working with others on the same journey. I do also enjoy a step by step approach.

 

Who, why or what encouraged you to train with Worklife Solutions?

I talked to a friend of a friend, who had worked with Cassandra. That gave me enough confidence to follow up with a call and make a training commitment, or should I say, learning commitment, to work with Cassandra.

(That friend was Lynnie Galloway. Despite her fear of letting go of a career that’s been familiar to her for over two decades, she wanted to transition from midwifery to becoming a career and life coach. She now has what I call a career

You can read Lynnie’s reinvention story here>>https://www.cassandragaisford.com/rebirthing-a-new-career-lynnies-reinvention-story/

 

What was the pivotal moment, turning point or catalyst to saying ‘yes’ now and committing to action i.e. enrolling, paying your fees and locking in a start date?

I saw that I had invested in other business and learning opportunities through my life. If I wanted to make a major shift, then there was no better time than now. As I had already decided that this was to be my most transformative decade of personal growth, I saw that it was time to commit, time to get started, as I have a whole lot of learning and growing to do.

 

 

 

What challenges did you face?

I decided to get a loan but the bank said ‘no’. So then it was a matter of working out the options and making it happen. I do find it easier to recognise other people’s amazing qualities than recognise my own authentic star quality. I just decided to start without knowing where it would all end.

 

The Final Destination – Steps I am preparing to take:

  • I am engaged in a training block with Worklife Solutions Coach Cassandra Gaisford.
  • I am facilitating a Point of Change Forum
  • I am thinking re other Forums that I would like to co-ordinate in the future
  • I am talking to my tile maintenance clients about Point of Change
  • I have resigned from BNI to give me more time
  • I have begun coordinating a once-monthly business ‘After 5’ in conjunction with another business person
  • I will begin to read helpful and inspirational books rather than just novels, which are my norm

 

What fears, if any, do you feel you did and must overcome? (The crisis/supreme ordeal)

I think I need to really believe in my future and in my own part to play in that. I still at times say, “Who Am I”? Technology and grappling with that is something I tend to put off doing as it seems just too hard.

 

Crossing the threshold – describe what you and your life will look like when you return with your treasure (Seizing the Reward – The road back)

  • I will continue to work 1-2 days a week doing tile maintenance because I enjoy it and it does provide a steady income.
  • I will coach 5 people a week.
  • I will co-ordinate 3 Forums a year on a variety of topics
  • I will join 2-3 groups of like-minded people
  • I will write a blog
  • I will write poetry regularly
  • I will exercise 2-3 times a week
  • There will be key partners who I will meet with regularly
  • The level of confidence will be much greater

 

 

What last tests do you feel you may face? How will you know you are reborn into a new and beautiful form (The Climax/resurrection)

Possibly relationally as Jenny and I work out where we each are going and how the new scenario works out. Financially as I work out what to charge and what ‘I am worth’ in the market Church – How much time and which activities I will participate in. The challenge of the organisation of resources. The challenge of learning new technology. The challenge of regularly producing content.

 

 

What a wonderful sense of clarity Brett has about the challenge we all face seeing our star qualities. A deep sense of delight in helping others and honouring our soul gifts of being able to see and bring forth the strengths in others is definitely a sign of alignment with spirit energy and being guided toward your purpose. Delightfully his purpose is tied to a goal which is to help others achieve transformational change. What a great role model!

 

If Brett can change his career at 60, so can you.

 

 

P.S. The friend that Brett spoke with was Lynnie Galloway. Despite her fear of letting go of a career that had been familiar to her for over two decades, she wanted to transition from midwifery to becoming a career and life coach. She now has what I call a career combo and has found fulfilment doing both. You can read Lynnie’s reinvention story here>>https://www.cassandragaisford.com/rebirthing-a-new-career-lynnies-reinvention-story/. We first connected many years ago when Lynnie approached me about training to become a Worklife Solutions Certified Career and Life Coach. But as you’ll read, she embarked on training with another provider, only to find it didn’t meet her needs.

Read an updated post and learn more about how in her sixties, Lynnie launched her new business and website! https://www.cassandragaisford.com/how-to-rejuvenate-your-life-and-change-careers-in-four-easy-steps/

If you’d like to learn more about how you can follow your passion and purpose and create a rewarding career, click here http://www.worklifesolutions.nz/coach-training

 

Listen to How to Find Your Passion and Purpose

Oh, my gosh! I am so excited that my most popular book, How to Find Your Passion and Purpose is now available as an audiobook. Listen to an excerpt here>>

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Wednesday, March 18th, 2020

How to love, not leave, your career during the Coronavirus crisis

 

Job sculpting: create a life of bliss

 

I am working around the clock to get my final edits done of my book, “Happy@work: job hunting for mid-lifer’s”. Tonight, I’m working on a favourite chapter of mine – “Love it, don’t leave it.”

 

As one frustrated HR manager said to me recently, “The only time people tell us what they want is when they are walking out the door. If only they would tell as what they need, then at least we could try and work something out.”

 

The trouble. as you may well know, is that most people don’t know what they want. So they hop from dissatisfying job, to dissatisfying job, never pausing long enough to work out what’s wrong. Conversations are never had with work colleagues and bosses to improve the unhappy situation, and internal opportunities are never followed. All in all it’s an incredible waste of talent, time, money and energy. But it doesn’t have to be this way.

 

Job sculpting is a term that came out research by career theorists at The Harvard Business School. They encourage people to chisel way at their staid, linear job descriptions and tailor responsibilities, tasks, even remuneration to better meet individual needs – and both people and organisations all over the world are doing just that.

 

If you are already employed, but not really enjoying it, you’ll find the job sculpting exercise in the book really helpful. As I was writing this chapter I reflected on my own experience.

 

My first job when I graduated from university as a mature student was working for an international recruitment firm. I had graduated with a Commerce degree – majoring in Human Resource Management. I was full of excitement about the prospects of landing a fantastic, high paying job. Hope turned to despair as initially I was only offered a role as a PA. I’d had seven years out of the workforce and even though I’d had numerous senior management roles prior to this, the organisation didn’t feel my skills were current enough.

 

I took a deep breath, sucked in my pride and, my eye firmly on my longer-term career goals, took the job. I was single-parenting at the time and desperate for relevant work experience. Even though I didn’t enjoy being a PA at all and I wasn’t too thrilled about not being taken more seriously I didn’t let it get to me. Leaving wasn’t an option. I actively set out to find ways of increasing my satisfaction and future career prospects. I signed up for an international certification in recruitment and asked my new boss if I could shadow him to gain more firsthand experience for my assignments. It wasn’t long before he rewarded my initiative and enthusiasm by promoting me to a trainee recruiter. Was I glad. Being a PA didn’t come naturally to me. I found all the running around and organising stressful. The money was terrible too.

 

For a while recruiting was fine but the individual performance targets, and sales culture didn’t sit well with my values. The hours were terrible too. At the interview they told me, “We know who will succeed here – they work late at night and they are here in the weekends. I was tempted to leave – especially after I developed shingles from all the stress.” The corporate culture was terrible and one of my bosses threatened to smash my head in if I asked him one more time if a candidate I was looking after was going to get an interview. I don’t know what was worse – his bullying or the fact that because he was a big biller, the company ignored his behaviour.

 

What I really wanted to do was help people find a job they would love. So, I did some internal research and found out that this was the kind of work that another part of the firm did. I networked actively with people in that department to learn more about what they did and to make a good impression in case an opportunity ever arose. When a vacancy came up I talked to my boss about moving across. He wasn’t happy at all. In fact, he was positively angry. He tried to make me resign and then reapply.

 

The company made me apply for the internal vacancy with other external candidates. I had three interviews – including a panel interview with 8 senior executives. I also had to do a role play and perform in an assessment centre. Everyone asked me, “why are you staying? You don’t have to put up with that.” But I did. I needed to get more experience to achieve my long-term goals. Besides I didn’t want my bully boss to win.

 

I visualised succeeding, practiced for the interviews, maintained my cool and promoted myself with passion. I got the job. Once again it was just a stepping-stone to where I truly wanted to be – career counselling and running my own business.

When I moved into this role it was still a sales role – I brought in the work and other people got to career counsel staff affected by redundancy. My motivated skills of counselling and coaching, and my values of helping people still weren’t met. I tried numerous times to get the company to allow me to redefine my role.

I showed them what was in it for them and how by helping me they would also grow the business. They wanted to keep me in sales. So, I looked around for another company who needed my sales and marketing skills but who would also give me the opportunity to coach people hands on.

While in the short-term I took a salary plummet, I moved to a Greenfield role that allowed me to gain the experience I needed. They also supported my counselling training. Four years later I went out on my own and trebled my salary and satisfaction.

Being self-employed meets all my criteria for career and life satisfaction. Importantly, it has allowed me the flexibility to support and care for my daughter during her school years. It’s also enabled me to make the best use of my talents and the things that give my work a sense of meaning and purpose.

My work is a powerful vehicle for me self-expression – it allows me to be who I am, and who I truly want to be, while serving others at the same time. Bliss!

If you are already working but unhappy at work, rather than leave, I can’t encourage you enough to look for internal opportunities to gain experience. Take a sideways move, put your hand up for a secondment, or identify an untapped market demand and create an internal opportunity.

Let other people leave their fate in others’ hands – but not you my friend, not you.

While now may not be the optimum time to change jobs, changing careers right where you are may be the ultimate survival strategy.

 

Enjoy that article? Here are three more things you might like:

 

Easy, Inspiring Ways to Whip Yourself Out of a Rut in Your Life, Relationships and Career

 

End Anxiety & Stop Panic Attacks!: A natural, fun, easy to implement approach to recover and regain control of your life

 

How To Find Your Passion and Purpose and Heed the Call For Courage

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